Adult Cestodes 2010 - Adult Cestode Infections by Drs....

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Adult Cestode Infections by Drs. Dwight Bowman and Araceli Lucio-Forster
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Today ± Cover adult tapeworms of humans ± Diphyllobothrium latum ± Hymenolepis diminuta ± Rodentolepis nana ± Dipylidium caninum ± Mesocestoides variabilis ± Taenia saginata ± Taenia solium ± Taenia asiatica
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At the end of the day you should… ± Be able to: ± Describe what an adult tapeworm looks like ± General morphology ± Recognize terminology associated with cestodes and cestode infection ± Explain how people get infected with adult tapeworms
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ADULT CESTODES ± Characterized by (note: exceptions in almost every case) ± Living in the small intestine ± Having: ± no body cavity ± no gut ± a segmented body ± some form of anterior holdfast (aka. Scolex) holdfast Proglottids
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ADULT CESTODES ± (continued…) ± Being monoecious (ie. hermaphroditic) ± Being white ± Having eggs (larvae in eggs have 6 hooklets) ± Eggs that are passed in the feces of the final host often inside a released segment ± ***The final host becoming infected by eating a larva in an intermediate host *** (have Indirect life cycles, except Rodentolepis )
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The typical adult tapeworm ± Has an anterior end = a holdfast (aka. scolex) ± For attachment and movement ± suckers or hooks ± Lack a mouth ± Food is absorbed through the tegument
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The tegument
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The typical adult tapeworm ± The “neck” ± a germinal area behind the scolex ± source of segments (proglottids) that make up the strobila = body
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The typical tapeworm ± Scolex ± Neck ± Stobila: ± Immature – closest to the neck ± Mature – behind the immature ± Gravid – contain eggs
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Typical tapeworm ± What are the parts called? 1 2 3 Body = 4 Individual segments=
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The proglottid ± Proglottid = a bag of reproductive structures
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The proglottid ± Proglottids typically have ± Genital openings (1 or 2) and ± Both male and female reproductive organs
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The Proglottid ± Uterus fills with eggs (i.e. becomes gravid) ± Tapeworms where segments release eggs into the feces ± called anapolyitic ± Tapeworms where segments detach from the strobila and pass out in feces before releasing eggs ± called apolytic
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Of course – not all tapeworms are typical ± Always exceptions to the rule ± Several groups have bodies with a single set of reproductive organs ± One group that has separate male and female strobila
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THERE ARE 14 ORDERS ± Orders are the largest meaningful grouping for most of the tapeworms ± Amphilinidea ± Gyrocotylidea ± Spathebothriidea ± Caryophyllidea ± Diphyllidea ± Trypanorhyncha ± Tetraphyllidea ± Lecanicephalide ± Pseudophyllidea ± Haplobothriidea ± Nippotaeniidea ± Proteocephalidea ± Tetrabothriidea ± Cyclophyllidea ± This is a huge group (mainly because better studied) ± The families of this group constitute the majority of parasites found in mammals and birds Important in Human Medicine
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Diphyllobothrium latum Broadfish Tapeworm Pseudophyllidae
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D. latum - general ± A parasite of large piscivorous mammals (bears, dogs, cats, etc.) ± Occasionally humans
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course BIOMI 4170 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Adult Cestodes 2010 - Adult Cestode Infections by Drs....

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