lab 3 - Bryan Spelhaug Tues Lab 8:00am Experiment III:...

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Bryan Spelhaug Tues Lab 8:00am Experiment III: Projectile Motion Date: 9/23/10 Objective: Projectile motion refers to the motion of an object projected into the air at an angle. In this experiment, we will be investigating how gravity, the earth’s force on an object, affects a steel ball bearing as it is pushed with a horizontal initial velocity V 0 , off a table. The force of gravity acts on the object with a downward acceleration of 9.8m/s 2 causing it to come to a rest. Method: For this experiment we utilized a ramp system set up on a lab table. We dropped the steel ball at a measured height h 0 of .08m. The ball was aloud to free-fall down the ramp and was caught at the end of the track. Positioned near the exit of the track, there were two photogates that measured the time it took the ball to move between them. We measured the distance between the sensing elements to be .029m. With this we calculated the initial velocity V 0 . We repeated this for five trials and recorded our average velocity. Next, we moved one of the photogates to a position on the ground. The ball was allowed to roll off the ramp and land on the ground where the photogate would collect the time of flight. Again, we did this for five trial runs. We then used the data we collected to see if the range (the distance traveled in the horizontal direction) was close to the measurement we calculated by laying a meter stick on the floor from the end of the table to the spot where the ball landed. This experiment was done twice,
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lab 3 - Bryan Spelhaug Tues Lab 8:00am Experiment III:...

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