2010-03-17 Chapter 13 Applications and Processing of Ceramics

2010-03-17 Chapter 13 Applications and Processing of Ceramics

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 - 1 ISSUES TO ADDRESS. .. How do we classify ceramics ? What are some applications of ceramics ? How is processing different than for metals ? Chapter 13: Applications and Processing of Ceramics
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 - 2 Properties: -- T m for glass is moderate, but large for other ceramics. Applications: -- High T , wear resistant, novel uses from charge neutrality. Fabrication -- some glasses can be easily formed -- other ceramics can not be formed or cast. Glasses Clay products Refractories Abrasives Cements Advanced ceramics -optical -composite reinforce -containers/ household -whiteware -bricks -bricks for high T (furnaces) -sandpaper -cutting -polishing -composites -structural engine -rotors -valves -bearings -sensors Adapted from Fig. 13.1 and discussion in Section 13.2-6, Callister 7e. Taxonomy of Ceramics IMPORTANT
Background image of page 2
Chapter 13 - 3 Pressing: GLASS FORMING Adapted from Fig. 13.8, Callister, 7e . (Fig. 13.8 is adapted from C.J. Phillips, Glass: The Miracle Maker , Pittman Publishing Ltd., London.) Ceramic Fabrication Methods-I Gob Parison mold Pressing operation Blowing: suspended Parison Finishing mold Compressed air Fiber drawing: wind up PARTICULATE FORMING CEMENTATION IMPORTANT Fiberglass reinforcements are made using fiber drawing
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 - 4 Sheet Glass Forming Sheet forming – continuous draw originally sheet glass was made by “floating” glass on a pool of mercury Adapted from Fig. 13.9, Callister 7e.
Background image of page 4
Chapter 13 - 5 Quartz is crystalline SiO 2 : Basic Unit: Glass is amorphous Amorphous structure occurs by adding impurities (Na + ,Mg 2+ ,Ca 2+ , Al 3+ ) Impurities: interfere with formation of crystalline structure. (soda glass) Adapted from Fig. 12.11, Callister, 7e . Glass Structure Si0 4 tetrahedron 4- Si 4+ O 2- Si 4+ Na + O 2- IMPORTANT
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 - 6 Specific volume (1 ) vs Temperature ( T ): Glasses : -- do not crystallize -- change in slope in spec. vol. curve at glass transition temperature , T g -- transparent - no crystals to scatter light Crystalline materials : -- crystallize at melting temp, T -- have abrupt change in spec. vol. at T m Adapted from Fig. 13.6, Callister, 7e . Glass Properties T Specific volume Supercooled Liquid solid T m Liquid (disordered) Crystalline (i.e., ordered) T g Glass (amorphous solid) IMPORTANT
Background image of page 6
Chapter 13 - 7 Glass Properties: Viscosity Viscosity, η : -- relates shear stress and velocity gradient: η has units of (Pa-s) y v d d η = τ velocity gradient d v d y τ τ glass d v d y
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 - 8 Viscosity decreases with T Impurities lower T deform Adapted from Fig. 13.7, Callister, 7e . (Fig. 13.7 is from E.B. Shand,
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course PHYSICS 1410 taught by Professor Falco during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

Page1 / 26

2010-03-17 Chapter 13 Applications and Processing of Ceramics

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online