CivilWar-1 - The Prophet I John Brown am now quite certain...

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The Prophet “I, John Brown am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land : will never be purged away ; but with Blood.” (Note scribbled by John Brown on the way to the gallows)
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Southern Unionism Together, slaves and border state residents made up half of all southerners. Because Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri did not secede, the war pitted the free labor states plus one-third of the slave labor states against but two-thirds of the slave labor states. The border region’s three largest cities—Baltimore, Louisville, and St. Louis—had more people than the fourteen largest cities in the Confederacy. They also denied the South much-needed industrial resources; control of that region would have doubled its factory potential and vastly increased its naval and railroad capacity.
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Who was Lincoln? Not an ethnic southerner, i.e. Scots Irish—of Puritan lineage. A poor boy who became a rich man. His parents were illiterate; he was self-educated; his eldest son went to Phillips Andover Academy and Harvard. A politician. He was 23 years old in 1832, and a relative stranger to his New Salem, Ill. neighbors, when he first declared his candidacy for the Illinois state leg. At the time, he had never read a law book and did not own a suit, but he was already determined to be at the center of things
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Who was Lincoln? (2) As a politician, he was an avid Whig, or supporter of the American Plan of Henry Clay.
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