172_print - Innovations 85 Innovations 1959-1971 David...

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Unformatted text preview: Innovations 85 Innovations 1959-1971 David Armstrong, Monte Burke, Emily Lambert Nathan Vardi, Rob Wherry, 12.23.02 1959 Three-Point Seat Belt After working on pilot ejection seats for Saab Aircraft, Swedish engineer Nils Bohlin (1920- 2002) moved on to Volvo as its head of safety engineering. There he realized that driver injuries could be reduced by using a seat belt that kept both the lower body and the upper torso in place; he introduced it 14 years before air bags. But just designing the device wasn't enough--Bohlin spent years calling on automakers and governments around the world to make his seat belt a standard. Today the U.S. Department of Transportation says the device saves 12,000 lives a year in this country. 1959 Integrated Circuit Two competitors share credit for the key innovation of the information age. Electrical engineers Robert Noyce (1927-1990) of Fairchild Corp., and Jack S. Kilby (b. 1923) of Texas Instruments, unaware of each other's work, figured out how to shrink the discrete components of a computer circuit board onto a sliver of silicon (Noyce) and germanium (Kilby). This dramatically increased a computer's power while reducing its cost. Their employers eventually agreed to share their patents, but Fairchild was the first to make its chips commercially available. The IC remains the building block of the electronic age. 1961 Pampers During a distinguished career at Procter & Gamble, Victor Mills (1896-1997) created tasty treats like Jif peanut butter, Duncan Hines cake mix and Pringles potato chips. But his biggest success at P&G came when he was charged with finding new paper products. Mills assigned a group of researchers to come up with an Click to zoom/ back to slide show Click to zoom/ back to slide show absorbent and disposable diaper that didn't leak. The end product gave birth to the $17 billion disposable diaper industry. Housewives had fewer loads of laundry to do--and environmentalists had something new to cry about. 1962 Telstar I It accounts for the fact you can call your cousin in Vilnius, Lithuania and she can watch the Super Bowl. The first commercial communications satellite was designed by Bell Labs' John R. Pierce (1910-2002), cost $3.5 million to launch and was used to broadcast television signals from Europe to the U.S. as well as transatlantic million to launch and was used to broadcast television signals from Europe to the U....
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course MIS 325 taught by Professor Mote during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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172_print - Innovations 85 Innovations 1959-1971 David...

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