Foodborne Illness - Part I

Foodborne Illness - Part I - Foodborne Pathogens Part I...

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Foodborne Pathogens – Part I Harrison FDST 4030/6030 1 Foodborne Illness – Part I Food Safety Goals and Surveillance of Foodborne Illness Foodborne Disease Process Har ison, FDST 4030/6030 Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Disease Typically our food supply is considered safe Problems can and do occur Foodborne illness in the U.S. Up to 38.4 million cases/yr in the U.S. estimated; 14 million known cases/yr 71,878 hospitalizations and 1,686 deaths Costs of billions of dollars/yr in the U.S. http://www.cdc.gov/eid/content/17/1/16.htm Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Disease Foods involved have included those of both animal and plant origins Most cases traced back to food service and mass feeding settings Problem commonly associated with improper food preparation and storage practices Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Disease Our aim is to determine what hazards can be related with a specific product and process and to try to control the situation Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Disease To determine the hazards we have to know about the: Pathogens that are potential problems with a particular product Factors that control the growth and survival of the pathogens Factors that can be used to eliminate the pathogens Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Potential for Microorganisms to Cause Illness The type of hazard a pathogen presents can range from none to severe Multiple factors can influence a risk Type and nature of the pathogen Hazard may be influenced by handling conditions
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Foodborne Pathogens – Part I Harrison FDST 4030/6030 2 Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Infectious Dose Number of pathogens needed to bring about illness in an individual can vary Susceptibility of the host is important Infectious nature of the pathogen is important Ability to produce toxins may be important Processing and handling practices can influence the likelihood of a sufficient dose being present Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Pathogens of Concern Bacteria: Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Campylobacter, Clostridium perfringes, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium botulinum, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Shigella, Vibrio species Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Pathogens of Concern Viruses: Hepatitis and Norovirus (Norwalk virus) are the most common types Parasites: Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, Giardia , etc. Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Foodborne Bacterial Illness Development The bacterial species must be present Proper environmental conditions must be present if bacterial growth is necessary: Temperature pH Available water Proper O 2 level Free of inhibitory Proper nutrients substances Number of organisms or amount of toxin ingested Harrison FDST 43030/6030 Factors that Contribute to Foodborne Illness Outbreaks Improper processing, storage, or holding conditions Inadequate thermal processing Poor personal hygiene
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course FDST 4030 taught by Professor Harrison during the Fall '11 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Foodborne Illness - Part I - Foodborne Pathogens Part I...

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