Foodborne Illness - Part II

Foodborne Illness - Part II - Foodborne Illness Part II...

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Foodborne Illness – Part II Harrison FDST 4030/6030 1 Foodborne Illness – Part II Bacterial Pathogens Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Staphylococcus aureus Gram positive coccus pH 4.-9.8; requires certain amino acids NaCl up to 15%; min. a w 0.86 for growth; min a w for toxin product 0.9 Nature of the toxin(s) Enterotoxin Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Staphylococcal food poisoning Nature of the illness Gastrointestinal Upper GI tract Symptoms nausea, vomiting, retching, abdominal cramping, prostration; Some demonstrate all the symptoms; Severe cases, headache, muscle cramping, and transient changes in blood pressure and pulse rate Frequency illness Very common Estimated case numbers??? Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Staphylococcal food poisoning Toxicity effect May not be true enterotoxins - do not act directly on intestinal cells Activates receptors on abdominal viscera stimulates vomiting center Brings on diarrhea by unk. mechanism Identification of the microbe or its toxin Toxic dose - <1.0 microgram Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Staphylococcal food poisoning Treatment of the illness Carriers may develop some type since they normally carry the m/o with no ill effect Typical foods which contain or are likely to contain this microorganism Previously heated foods - less competition More foodservice than processed foods Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Staphylococcal food poisoning T ypical way this microorganism gets into/onto the food Sanitation breakdown Prevention/reduction strategy for this microorganism Sanitation Proper heating, cooling, re-heating, holding temp Effects of processing related to this microorganism Enterotoxin presents some problems since it is heat resistant
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Foodborne Illness – Part II Harrison FDST 4030/6030 2 Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Clostridium botulinum Gram positive rod Anaerobic Forms endospores 7 types A, B, C, D, E, F, G Types A and B are the most toxic Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Clostridium botulinum Type A - botulism in humans proteolytic spores more heat resistant Type B - botulism in humans some proteolytic, some nonproteolytic proteolytic spores - more heat resistant Types C and D - botulism in birds and others Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Clostridium botulinum Type E - botulism in humans fish associated nonproteolytic can grow at 3.3 o C Type F - only a few cases Type G - isolated only a few times Clostridium botulinum Characteristic Group I II III IV Neurotoxin types A, B, F B, E, F C, D G Min growth temperature 10 o C3 o C1 5 o C- Opt growth temperature 35-40 o C 18-25 o C4 0 o 7 o C Min growth pH 4.6 ~5 - - Inhibitory [NaCl] 10% 5% - - Min a w for growth 0.94 0.97 - - D 100 C of spores 25 min <0.1 min 0.1-0.9 min 0.8-1.12 min D 121 C of spores 0.1-0.2 min <0.001 min - - Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Harrison FDST 4030/6030 Clostridium botulinum Nature of the toxin(s) Heat labile protein - inactivated at 80 o C in 5-10 min Preformed toxin Most lethal natural substance Molecule produced is not fully toxic until after proteolysis Harrison
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course FDST 4030 taught by Professor Harrison during the Fall '11 term at UGA.

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Foodborne Illness - Part II - Foodborne Illness Part II...

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