Unit 2 Study Guide

Unit 2 Study Guide - Unit 2 Study Guide Ch 4 Behavorial Processes 1 Identify what a skill is and contrast a skill memory with memories for events

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Unit 2 Study Guide Ch. 4 Behavorial Processes 1. Identify what a skill is, and contrast a skill memory with memories for events and facts. Skill is an ability that you can improve that you can improve time through practice. A skill memory is difficult to convey to others while memories for events and facts can be communicated flexibly. Skill memories may be acquired without awareness, while memories for events and facts have content that is consciously accessible. Skill memory requires several repetitions while memories for events & facts can be acquired in a single exposure. 2. Explain the difference between closed and open skills. Skills that depend on performing predefined movements that, ideally, never vary are closed skills while open skills are those that require performing movements in response to predictions about ongoing changes in circumstances. IE) ballet are closed skills in that it consists on performing predefined movements while other kinds of dancing, such as salsa or swing dancing, depends to some extent on the dancers’ predicting (or directing) their partner’s next move. 3. Contrast cognitive skills with perceptual-motor skills. Cognitive skills require you to use your brain to solve problems or apply strategies, such as playing cards, budgeting your money, taking standardized tests, rather than to simply move your body based on what you perceive while perceptual-motor skills are learned movement patterns guided by sensory inputs such as driving a car, dancing, drinking out of a glass, snapping your fingers, etc. 4. Describe the relationship between talent, expertise, and cognitive and perceptual-motor skills. Talent is a particular skill in which someone is really good at completing it. People who perform these skills or have a talent for something that is extra ordinarily good is said to be an expert. 5. Describe how different forms of practice contribute to the acquisition of skills. Concentrated continuous practice, or massed practice generally produces better performance in the short term while spaced practice, spread out over several sessions, leads to better retention in the long run. Constant practice consists of repeatedly practicing the same skills under fixed conditions does not improve performance as much as variable practice which consists of practicing a skill in a wider variety of conditions. Either way, all these will contribute to the acquisition of skills in one way or another. 6. Define implicit learning and describe ways in which it is measured (e.g., serial reaction time task). Implicit learning is learning to perform certain skills without even being aware that you are learning. It comes in two forms; one is when an individual performs some task and incidentally learns an underlying skill that improves their performance. The second form is seen in individuals with amnesia. The individual with amnesia acquires skills from one session to the next without ever being aware that they have practiced it in the past.
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course PSY 4396 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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Unit 2 Study Guide - Unit 2 Study Guide Ch 4 Behavorial Processes 1 Identify what a skill is and contrast a skill memory with memories for events

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