Job-related+tension+-+scoring+instructions

Job-related+tension+-+scoring+instructions - people that...

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Job-related Tension How frequently are you bothered at work by: Never Rarely Some- times Rather often Very often 1. Feeling that you have too little authority to carry out the responsibilities assigned to you. 2. Being unclear on just what the scope and responsibilities of your job are. 3. Not knowing what opportunities for advancement or promotion exist for you. 4. Feeling that you have too heavy a work load, one that you can’t possibly finish during an ordinary workday. 5. Thinking that you’ll not be able to satisfy the conflicting demands of various people over you. 6. Feeling that you’re not fully qualified to handle your job. 7. Not knowing what your immediate supervisor thinks of you, how he or she evaluates your performance. 8. The fact that you can’t get information needed to carry out your job. 9. Having to decide things that affect the lives of individuals,
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Unformatted text preview: people that you know. 10. Feeling that you may not be liked and accepted by the people you work with. 11. Feeling unable to influence your immediate supervisors decisions and actions that affect you. 12. Not knowing just what the people you work with expect of you. 13. Thinking that the amount of work you have to do may interfere with how well it gets done. 14. Feeling that you have to do things on the job that are against your better judgment. 15. Feeling that your job tends to interfere with your personal life. Scoring Score each item based on the following scale then sum the item scores to get a total score for each participant. Never = 1, Rarely=2, Sometimes=3, Rather Often=4, Very Often=5 Reference Kahn, R., Wolfe, D., Quinn, R., Snoek, J., & Rosenthal, R. (1964). Organizational stress: Studies in role conflict and ambiguity. New York: Wiley....
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course PSY 3335 taught by Professor Osborne during the Summer '10 term at Texas State.

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