Fallacy of equivocation

Fallacy of equivocation - do that. They merely receive and...

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Fallacy of equivocation – using an important word in an argument in 2 different senses o Only man is a rational being. (Man as in “human beings/mankind”) No woman is a man. (Man as in “male human being”) So, no woman is a rational being. Mary Anne Warren o Warren says that the RTL argument commits equivocation between Premise 1 and 2. Here, it is presented: Premise 1: All HB have a RTL. (she claims human beings are used here in a moral sense, “person”) Premise 2: The Fetus is a HB (she says human being here is in the genetic sense). o Warren suggests that the attributes of a human being in the moral sense are as follows: a consciousness a reasoning a self-motivated activity a the capacity to communicate, by whatever means, messages, of an indefinite variety of types a the presence of self-concepts/ self-awareness a A human being can separate itself from the world out there & itself, the receiver. Animals cannot
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Unformatted text preview: do that. They merely receive and experience the world. o Warren argues that fetuses do not pass any of these requirements. o The problem with Warrens argument is that newborn babies do not pass any of these tests either. o What of infanticide? Although newborn babies are not human beings by her definition, she says that there is a better option: adoption. a Lets say Siegmann was in possession of a famous Da Vinci painting, but over time, he got sick of it, so he decides that hes going to light a match & burn it. However, his friend stops saying, You may not want it. But other people do. (or it may not be valuable to you, but its valuable to other people.). a She applies the same idea to abortion. Its not morally wrong but its not the best thing to do....
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This note was uploaded on 09/30/2011 for the course PHILOSOPHY PHI2600 taught by Professor Siegmann during the Spring '11 term at FIU.

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