The Ethics of Respect for Nature

The Ethics of Respect for Nature - T he Ethics of Respect...

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The Ethics of Respect for Nature o Paul W. Taylor (handout) Inherent (intrinsic) Worth (value) – the value lies within the thing itself and not in its usefulness to others Suppose Siegmann needed a heart transplant. Why can’t Siegmann just find someone with a compatible heart, shoot them, & take their heart? He wouldn’t use another human being in this way because they have a value independent of Siegmann (typically, Siegmann will say “individual rights” rather than inherent value). What Taylor does is apply this worth to ALL living things. On his view, every living thing is an end in itself, not merely a means for the usefulness of others. To be distinguished from… Instrumental Value – the value of the thing lies in its usefulness to others (opposite of inherent value) p. 204 (2nd column) – “The idea of a being having a good of its own, as I understand it, does not entail that the being must have interests or take an interest in what affects its life for better or for worse. We can act in a being’s interest or contrary to its interest without
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The Ethics of Respect for Nature - T he Ethics of Respect...

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