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Lecture11-MemoryRealWorld

Lecture11-MemoryRealWorld - Lecture 11 Memory in the World...

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1 Lecture 11: Memory in the World Fall 2009 Prof. Lombrozo Overview of today’s class: 1. Eyewitness testimony 2. Flashbulb memories 3. Recovered memories Reminder: Assignment 4 due by Friday @ 10pm 11.2 Memory in the Real World Everyday memory: – Remembering names, numbers, people, events – Memorizing vocabulary – Learning course material Cases with societal implications: – Eyewitness testimony Exceptional events with personal implications: – Flashbulb memory – Recovered memory 11.3 Eyewitness Testimony 75,000 suspects identified by eyewitness in US each year (Wells et al., 1994) 4,500 wrongful convictions based on mistaken eyewitness identification in US each year! (Penrod & Cutler, 1999)
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2 11.4 The Lineup 11.5 Why are eyewitnesses unreliable? General limitations – Working memory is limited – We forget with time “Knowledge effects” – Effect of schemas, prior beliefs – Misinformation effect Elizabeth Loftus 11.6 The Misinformation Effect Phenomenon : Information obtained after a remembered event can alter memory for the event Loftus, Burns, & Miller (1978) “Did another car pass the red sports car while it was stopped at the yield sign?” Loftus & Palmer (1974) “About how fast were the cars going when they hit/smashed each other?” “Did you see any broken glass?”
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