The Lost Boys of Sudan Research Paper.docx - Anthropology 304 The Lost Boys of Sudan Film Research Introduction The documentary The Lost Boys of Sudan

The Lost Boys of Sudan Research Paper.docx - Anthropology...

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Anthropology 304 The Lost Boys of Sudan Film Research Introduction The documentary The Lost Boys of Sudan by PBS depicts the perseverance and courage the young boys of Sudan had to have when they were forced to flee their homes due to war and find new ones. The Dinka and Nuer are two tribes originating from Sudan that were violently attacked and ravaged by Arabic Muslims during civil war in their country. The film follows the journey of two young refugees trying to piece their lives back together as they travel to Ethiopia, Kenya and ultimately the United States. Along the way they are confronted by physical threats, racism, conversion of religious practice and circumstances that test their bond. Physical threats The second Sudanese Civil War took place in 1983. Sudan was attacked by Arabic Muslims, resulting in the death of one million civilians. The adults were murdered, most of the young girls were taken, and left more than thirty thousand boys orphaned. This group of boys were given the name of “The Lost Boys of Sudan”- a reference to Peter Pan and the gang of parentless boys that follow him. Fleeing for their lives and trying to avoid the same fate shared by their family and friends, they began the initial phase of their journey in search of help. The boys headed to Ethiopia where they hoped to find shelter in the United Nations refugee camps. This trek was proven difficult, the barefoot walk would take them over grueling months. To survive the boys needed to adapt. They ate wild berries, plants, and small insects. They did not have a reliable water source, so the boys were forced to drink water from mud puddles and ultimately resorted to drinking their own urine. On occasion they would receive food drops from the United Nations or the Red Cross, but they were few and far between, and many of the boys died of dehydration and starvation. The children were extremely vulnerable to their surroundings and would be taken as prey by the wild animals. Some of the older boys tried to protect the younger ones, but the average age of the older children was about nine to ten years old and they could only do so much. In the film when some of the boys were reunited with each other for a summer camp in DC, they reminisce about the hardships they endured. As a handful of them, now teens, splashed and played in an Olympic sized pool, one boy mentioned how they had to cross the Gilo river while seeking asylum. During that one event, they lost over a thousand boys
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