10 Motor Cerebel BG - LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MOTOR CONTROL:...

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N-99 LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MOTOR CONTROL: CEREBELLUM AND BASAL GANGLIA 1. Describe the primary function of the cerebellum. 2. Describe the general anatomy and physiology of the three major functional regions of the cerebellum. List the cerebellar deep nuclei associated with each functional region. 3. List the pathological signs associated with cerebellar lesions. 4. Identify the structures that comprise the basal ganglia system, and describe the primary functions of the basal ganglia. 5. Compare and contrast hyperkinetic and hypokinetic disorders. List examples of diseases for each of these classifications. 6. Describe the characteristic deficits associated with Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and ballism. 7. Identify the locations of lesions that will produce Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, or ballism.
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N-100 Robert W. Blair, Ph.D. MOTOR CONTROL: CEREBELLUM AND BASAL GANGLIA Reading: Widmaier et al., Human Physiology, 12 th ed., pp. 300-303 CEREBELLUM I. Introduction Although the cerebellum receives input from receptors in muscle and skin, as well as from special senses, lesions of cerebellum do not produce sensory deficits or muscle weakness. Instead, cerebellar lesions produce disturbances in coordination of movement, muscle tone, and/or posture. The primary function of the cerebellum is to produce coordination of movements . The cerebellum is involved with learning new movements, equilibrium adjustments, and planning and coordination of movements. It may be a repository for learned movement "programs." II. Organization of Cerebellum A. 3 major lobes Primary fissure Posterolateral fissure Figure 1: Mid-sagittal view of cerebellum and brainstem. Fissures are indicated by curved lines. Arrows indicate how the cerebellum is "unrolled" for the view in the next figure. 1. Anterior lobe, separated by primary fissure from 2. Posterior lobe, separated by posterolateral fissure from 3. Flocculonodular lobe
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N-101 B. 3 major mediolateral regions 1. Vestibulocerebellum (flocculonodular lobe and adjacent vermis) 2. Spinocerebellum (most of vermis and paravermal zone) 3. Cerebrocerebellum (hemispheric or lateral zone) C. Cerebellar Deep Nuclei IV Pons Fastigial n.
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10 Motor Cerebel BG - LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MOTOR CONTROL:...

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