11 EEG - LEARNING OBJECTIVES: EEG, WAKEFULNESS, AND SLEEP...

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N-108 LEARNING OBJECTIVES: EEG, WAKEFULNESS, AND SLEEP 1. Identify the four major EEG wave patterns. Describe how the pattern of the EEG changes as you go from stage 1 to stage 4 sleep, and the unusual characteristics of REM sleep. 2. Compare and contrast Non-REM and REM sleep. 3. Identify the patterns of activity of the aminergic and cholinergic nuclei during different stages of wakefulness and sleep. 4. Describe the general mechanism involving the suprachiasmatic nucleus for defining the rhythm of sleep. Describe how the pattern of sleep changes with age. 5. Describe how the pattern of sleep changes during one night of sleep. 6. Identify examples of substances that can induce sleepiness. 7. Define seven major sleep disorders.
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N-109 Robert W. Blair, Ph.D. EEG, WAKEFULNESS, AND SLEEP Reading: Widmaier et al., Human Physiology, 12 th ed., pp. 228-233 I. Consciousness: What is it? A. Definition of “conscious”: capable of responding to sensory stimuli and having subjective experiences. From the Latin “conscius” meaning aware B. Definitions of “consciousness”: responsiveness of the mind to the impressions made by the senses; awareness of environment and self C. Two components of consciousness 1. Cognitive processes involving the cerebral cortex 2. Arousal and wakefulness involving brainstem and thalamus II. EEG (Electroencephalogram) A. Used for diagnosis of localized or generalized brain lesions induced by trauma, infection, or other processes. B. Wave Patterns (Fig. 8-3, p. 234): EEG waves are described by amplitude and frequency. Frequencies vary from 1-40 Hz, and amplitudes from 1-100 μV. Figure 1: Major wave patterns in the EEG. 1 sec Beta (>13 Hz) Alpha (8-13 Hz) Theta (4-7 Hz) Delta (<4 Hz)
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N-110 1. Beta: > 13 Hz, smallest amplitude, desynchronized, awake 2. Alpha: 8-13 Hz, small amplitude, relaxed with eyes closed 3. Theta: 4-7 Hz, small amplitude, light sleep 4. Delta: < 4 Hz, large amplitude, deep sleep C. States of wakefulness and sleep (Table 8-1, p. 232) 1. Awake: Desynchronized EEG, alert, and “conscious” 2. Slow-wave sleep: Synchronized EEG (synchronized sleep), non-REM (NREM) sleep 3. REM (rapid eye movement) sleep: Desynchronized EEG (therefore desynchronized sleep) but not alert or “conscious,” paradoxical sleep (because resembles awake in EEG) . D. Typical patterns of EEG activity during wakefulness and sleep (Fig. 8-4, p. 230) Stage 1 Awake REM Stage 2 Spindle K Complex Stage 3 Stage 4 Figure 2: EEG patterns during different stages of sleep. 1. Awake (or stage W): desynchronized beta waves, alpha waves (mainly seen over occipital and parietal lobes when eyes are closed), random activity; high muscle activity
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N-111 2. NREM sleep: Has four stages. a.
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2011 for the course PSYO 5016 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at The University of Oklahoma.

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11 EEG - LEARNING OBJECTIVES: EEG, WAKEFULNESS, AND SLEEP...

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