2011 Introduction to Metabolism

2011 Introduction to Metabolism - Dr. Kennon M. Garrett...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
E-24 Dr. Kennon M. Garrett INTRODUCTION TO METABOLISM Reading: Vander et al., Human Physiology, 12 th ed. pp. 555-560. Behavioral Objectives 1. Define absorptive and postabsorptive states 2. Indentify metabolic pathways of glucose, triglyceride and amino acids in liver, muscle and adipose tissue during absorptive state. 3. Identify metabolic pathways of glucose, triglyceride and amino acids in liver, muscle and adipose tissue during postabsorptive state. I. Introduction to Cellular Metabolism A. Review of Macromolecules 1. Carbohydrates 2. Lipids 3. Protein 4. Nucleic Acids B. Carbohydrates 1. Monosaccharides - glucose, galactose, fructose (Fig. 2-9) primary energy source of body Synthesis - gluconeogenesis Catabolism - glycolysis , Krebs cycle (TCA cycle) 2. Polysaccharides - glycogen (Fig. 2-11) storage form of carbohydrates, found in liver (25%) and skeletal muscle (75%) synthesis - formed from monosaccharides catabolism - glycogenolysis , releases monosaccharides
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
E-25 C. Lipids 1. Triglycerides (triacylglycerols) (Fig. 2-12) synthesized from glycerol and fatty acids, storage form of lipids 2. Lipolysis - oxidation of triglycerides to produce glycerol and fatty acids D. Proteins - polymers of amino acids In addition to the roles of proteins in cell structure and function, proteins can also be used as a source of fuel. Proteins are metabolized to free amino acids which are then further metabolized to keto acids (Fig. 3-50)
Background image of page 2
E-26 E. Overview of metabolic pathways (a physiologist’s view, Fig. 3-40) II. Introduction to metabolism A. Absorptive state - ingested nutrients are entering the blood from the GI tract (approx. 4 hr after a meal) B. Postabsorptive state - GI tract is empty and energy is supplied by body stores. late morning and late afternoon and entire night C. Fasting - more than 24 hours without eating III. Absorptive state (Fig. 16-1) Some nutrients are utilized for immediate energy requirements. The remainder are added to the body energy stores. The body’s energy stores are able to withstand a fast of many weeks providing adequate supply of water.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/01/2011 for the course PSYO 5016 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at The University of Oklahoma.

Page1 / 12

2011 Introduction to Metabolism - Dr. Kennon M. Garrett...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online