Oct19 - 1 SOCIOLOGY 101 Introduction to Sociology SOCIAL...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 SOCIOLOGY 101 Introduction to Sociology SOCIAL CONTROL: FORMAL CONTROL 2 Previously on Introduction to Sociology. Informal Control as the first line of attack against deviant behavior (and usually the last line of attack against criminal behavior) Control theorists argue that the roots of deviance are sociological: The weaker the social bonds (personal attachments, investment, involvement, internalization of norms) between an individual and society, the more likely s/he is to deviate from (not conform to) accepted rules. Informal control is based on interpersonal pressures such that everyday recurring exchanges between individuals maintain and create the social stratification system Defining Deviance Deviance: behavior that is recognized as violating expected rules and norms Not all behaviors are judged similarly by all groups Established rules and norms are socially created, therefore deviance is socially constructed Sociologists distinguish between: formal deviance informal deviance Focus on both the behavior and the societal reaction to it The Context of Deviance Variation in definitions of deviance and consequences for deviants by: context and over time Points to the social function of deviance for the society. Durkheim: societies need deviance to know what normal behavior is. Recognition and punishment of deviance: affirms the collective beliefs of the society reinforces social order inhibits future deviant behavior. Deviance thereby produces social solidarity 3 The Social Construction of Deviance Conventional view: deviance as result of individualistic or personality factors. May be a positive adaptation to a situation the Andes survivors Or a rational adaptation to some situations gang members Deviant behavior is often encouraged and praised. Some behaviors defined as deviant are similar to so- called normal behavior. What is considered deviant or normal depends on the social context/situation. explicit language Rosa Parks drinking alone/drinking with friends Psychological Explanations Emphasize individual factors, such as brain functioning and personality Testosterone levels, age, low IQ, low self-control Sociological criticism: Incomplete perspective because it fails to focus on the social conditions surrounding deviant behavior....
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Oct19 - 1 SOCIOLOGY 101 Introduction to Sociology SOCIAL...

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