06 MetamRocks - Large regions (volumes) of rock are...

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METAMORPHIC ROCKS CH 8 Metamorphic Rocks: form by mineralogical and/or textural change of igneous, sedimentary, & metamorphic rocks - all changes occur in the solid state ... recrystallization
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Causes of metamorphism 1. Mineralogical changes: I) heat (temperature increases; T) ii) pressure P iii) rock composition 8.26
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8.22 The Geothermal Gradient: change of temperature with depth (pressure).
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8.21 Sediment (burial) sedimentary rock metamorphic rock 11.23 burial during deformation P T
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2. Textural changes: types of stresses (pressures) [pressure = force/area] i) hydrostatic (lithostatic) ii) differential (deviatoric or nonhydrostatic) Compressive Tensional Shear 11.9
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11.10 hydrostatic
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Types of Metamorphism 1. Contact Metamorphism Cause: heat from an igneous intrusion Stresses: hydrostatic Rock: hornfels - nonfoliated texture (random orientation of minerals) 8.23 8.10 micas amphiboles quartz prismatic sheets equant
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2. Shear (Dynamic) Metamorphism (8.24) Stresses: shear Rock: Mylonite Fault
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3. Regional Metamorphism
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Unformatted text preview: Large regions (volumes) of rock are involved. Occurs in mountain ranges- high temperatures & pressure- stresses are compressional FOLIATION: preferred mineral orientation (alignment of prismatic & sheet minerals) to compressive stresses 8.25 collision zone UP 11.2 Major Mountain Ranges on Land 8.13 8.12 Shale Slate 8.14 Deformed Conglomerate Conglomerate 8.5 sandstone quartzite Limestone Marble 8.17 Grades of Metamorphism- temperatures & pressures 8.18 LOW HIGH P MELTING (magmas) T Regional Metamorphism of Shale P. 218-219 slate schist gneiss shale Strong foliation Crystals become large New minerals are formed See also 8.19 8.3 Gneiss (banded) P. 202 Gneiss Index Minerals: minerals that indicate the grade of metamorhism- muscovite & biotite = low grade- garnet = medium grade- sillimanite = high grade Metamorphic Zones Northern Appalachians (8.20) The Rock Cycle (Interlude B, p. 228)...
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2011 for the course GEOLOGY 100 taught by Professor Lepre during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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06 MetamRocks - Large regions (volumes) of rock are...

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