01 SolarSys - p.26-27c original artwork by Gary Hincks...

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Fig. 1.00 R. Williams (ST Scl)-NASA
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Fig. 1.09ab W. W. Norton
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Fig. 1.12ab W. W. Norton (a) (b)
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Fig. 1.13 J. Hester and P. Scowen/NASA
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p.26-27 original artwork by Gary Hincks
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p.26-27a Forming the solar system, according to the nebula hypothesis: A second- or third- generation nebula forms from hydrogen and helium left over from the big bang, as well as from heavier elements that were produced by fusion reactions in stars or during explosion of stars. The nebula condenses into a swirling disc, with a central ball surrounded by rings.
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p.26-27b original artwork by Gary Hincks The ball at the center grows dense and hot enough for fusion reactions to begin. It becomes the Sun. Dust (solid particles) condenses in the rings. Dust particles collide and stick together, forming planetesimals.
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Unformatted text preview: p.26-27c original artwork by Gary Hincks Gravity reshapes the proto-Earth into a sphere. The interior of the Earth separates into a core and mantle. Forming the planets from planetesimals: Planetesimals grow by continuous collisions. Gradually, an irregularly shaped proto-Earth develops. The interior heats up and becomes soft. p.26-27d original artwork by Gary Hincks Soon after Earth forms, a small planet collides with it, blasting debris that forms a ring around the Earth. The Moon forms from the ring of debris. p.26-27e original artwork by Gary Hincks Eventually, the atmosphere develops from volcanic gases. When the Earth becomes cool enough, moisture condenses and rains to create the oceans. Fig. 1.16 W. W. Norton Fig. 1.17 W. W. Norton...
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2011 for the course GEOLOGY 100 taught by Professor Lepre during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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01 SolarSys - p.26-27c original artwork by Gary Hincks...

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