09 Continetal Drift

09 Continetal Drift - of the Earth’s magnetic polarity at...

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Fig. 3.03 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.04
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Fig. 3.05 W. W. Norton. Modified from Motz.
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Fig. 3.06a
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Fig. 3.06b W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.08 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.09 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.10 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.11b W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.14ab W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.17 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.19 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.20
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W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.22 W. W. Norton. Modified from Rothé, 1954.
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Fig. 3.23 W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.24a W. W. Norton
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Fig. 3.24b W. W. Norton. Modified from Mason, 1955.
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The earth behaves like a giant magnet, and thus is surrounded by a magnetic field. The magnetism is due to the flow of liquid iron alloy in the outer core.
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p.68-69b original artwork by Gary Hincks Earth’s magnetic field can be represented by a dipole that points from the north magnetic pole to the south. Every now and then, the magnetic polarity reverses. Normal polarity Reversed polarity
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p.68-69c original artwork by Gary Hincks The rock of oceanic crust preserves a record
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Unformatted text preview: of the Earth’s magnetic polarity at the time the crust formed. Eventually, a symmetric pattern of polarity stripes develops. p.68-69d original artwork by Gary Hincks The age of oceanic crust varies with location. The youngest crust lies along a mid-ocean ridge, and the oldest along the coasts of continents. Here, the different color stripes correspond to different ages of oceanic crust. Red is youngest, purple is oldest. Marine magnetic anomalies are stripes representing alternating bands of oceanic crust that differ in the measured strength of the magnetic field above them. Stronger fields are measured over crust with normal polarity, while weaker fields are measured over crust with reversed polarity. Normal polarity Reversed polarity Mid-ocean ridge (normal polarity) Fig. 3.28b W. W. Norton Fig. 3.28a W. W. Norton W. W. Norton...
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2011 for the course GEOLOGY 100 taught by Professor Lepre during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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09 Continetal Drift - of the Earth’s magnetic polarity at...

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