career_assessment_workshop

career_assessment_workshop - Career Assessment Workshop...

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Career Assessment Workshop Interests Interests define activities you enjoy doing. Dr. John Holland developed the Holland theory of careers which is the basis for many of the career inventories used today. Because the results of many career assessment instruments use the Holland theory to organize their results, the results of a multi-measurement battery of assessments such as interests and skills using the Holland theory can be easily compared to determine if the pattern of each assessment is supportive of the other assessment results. The overall assessment profile then can be compared against other measures such as personality and values assessment results to determine if these measures are supportive or point to counseling issues. Holland's theory states that most people can be loosely categorized with respect to the following six types: Realistic types enjoy working with things (machine operator, outdoors) Investigative types enjoy working with concepts and ideas (research, engineering, medical) Artistic types are described as creative (music, art, literature, drama) Social types enjoy helping others face to face (nurse, teacher, counselor, clergy) Enterprising types are described as persuaders (sales, law, politics, business executive) Conventional types are described as organizers (words and numbers, office administration) Links to More Information: Holland’s Six Personality Types http://www.careerkey.org/english/you/hollands_6personalities.html RAISEC Career Interests Worksheet http://www.cdm.uwaterloo.ca/Your_Career_Interests.asp Skills The O*Net defines a skill as the ability to perform a task well and proposes skills are usually developed over time through training or experience. A skill can be transferable and used in combination with other skills to do work in many jobs; also a skill can be used in learning. Skills important in the current and future labor market are: basic skills learning skills
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advanced technical skills communication skills skills working with others. Some skills necessary for meaningful work include: technical and technological skills visionary skills organizational skills persuasive skills communication skills ability to learn. Skills related activities important to success in the workplace are: identify and build your personal database of skills, experience, and education develop technical and information competencies create customized resumes using the database of skills identified learn attitudes that empower you strengthen your core abilities, including reading, math, problem solving and more communicate your skills and verbalize your accomplishments market your skills. TRANSFERABLE SKILLS
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course CPSY 1112 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Oklahoma State.

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career_assessment_workshop - Career Assessment Workshop...

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