ln007 - Problem Analysis A design example: Fetch an Object...

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Problem Analysis A design example: Fetch an Object The animat is tasked with retrieving a block of tofu. We will use goal oriented decomposition Best matched to our definition of intelligence Goals imply sub-goals Primitive sub-goals can easily implemented by behavioral/functional components Intelligence is the computational part of the ability to achieve goals in some world.
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Problem Analysis Fetch Tofu Find Tofu Collect Tofu Retrieve Tofu Walk to Next Scan Location Scan Environment Radius Scan Rays Scan Move Close to Tofu Pick up Tofu Plan Path to Home Base Walk to Home Base And/Or Goal Trees When enough sub-goals are achieved to achieve the goal at the root of the and/or goal tree, the goal tree is said to be satisfied .
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Problem Analysis Formal Test Procedures: Procedure TestNode : if the node is trivially satisfied then return true; else if the node is an AND node then use the TestAndNode procedure; else if the node is an OR node then use the TestOrNode procedure; Procedure TestAndNode : for each child node use the TestNode procedure if a child node returned false then return false; If all child nodes returned true return true; Procedure TestOrNode : for each child node use the TestNode procedure; if a child node returned true then return true; Fetch Tofu Find Tofu Collect Tofu Retrieve Tofu Scan Environment Radius Scan Rays Scan Note : the test procedure also gives you a way to execute a goal tree - goal reduction
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Problem Analysis Construct and/or goal trees for the following high-level goals: Walk around a 270˚ corner Initial condition: you are parallel to a wall Goal: if you find a 270˚ corner, take it
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course CSC 592 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Rhode Island.

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ln007 - Problem Analysis A design example: Fetch an Object...

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