Hughes_and_Eliot #2

Hughes_and_Eliot #2 - Composition 2 Rough Draft#1...

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Composition 2 Rough Draft #1 Instructor: Ms. Briese 5 March 2010 Hughes and Eliot: cultural and historical themes and symbolism “The Waste Land” is written by an extremely famous poet of the Renaissance era named T.S. Eliot. Thomas Stearns Eliot is born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1888 and after receiving and education at Smith Academy in St. Louis and Milton Academy in Massachusetts; he attends Harvard University (Bloom 1). Eliot studies at two academies before he is an undergraduate at Harvard. After Eliot is rejected by the Navy because of ill health, he begins writing “The Waste Land”(Ryan 1). (help change?) Because Eliot is ill, he begins to write his most famous long poem. In 1964, Eliot receives the American Medal of Freedom and dies January 4, 1965 (James 1). After receiving the American Medal of Freedom, Eliot dies in 1965 at the age of 76. “Big Meeting” and “Christ in Alabama” are written by Langston Hughes, another Harlem Renaissance poet. Hughes is born February 1, 1902 in Joplin, Missouri; he later attends Columbia University and Lincoln University, and during the 1920’s is recognized as an important literary figure (Contemporary Authors Online 1). After attending Columbia University and Lincoln University, Hughes is recognized as an important literary figure. Because of a congestive heart failure, Hughes dies on May 22, 1967 in New York City (Contemporary Authors Online 1). Because Hughes incorporates outstanding African American cultural theme, his poetry is distinguished.
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Thesis: Since Langston Hughes and T.S. Eliot use cultural and historical themes, the symbolism in “The Waste Land” by Eliot and Hughes’s “Big Meeting” and “Christ in Alabama” is memorable.. Although Langston Hughes and T.S. Eliot come from contrasting cultural backgrounds, they both exercise similar Christian beliefs. In addition, similar symbols, such as death, through both Christ and man and violence in how African Americans were treated along with how Christ and man are treated, are similar. Furthermore, they share symbols of religion; though Eliot refers to Christianity in a general sense by using phrases from biblical times; whereas, Hughes specifically speaks of the crucifixion of Christ. Also in their poetry is a sense of jazz; however, Hughes is well known for his ability to incorporate blues and jazz into his work, and Eliot is better known for rhythm.
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