Lecture 9- Stability and Control

Lecture 9- Stability and Control - AOE 2104-Aerospace and...

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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style AOE 2104 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering Lecture 9 Stability and Control
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style A note on drag and efficiency factors before moving on…
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Definitions of Drag Coefficients The notation used in Anderson is not very specific in the drag derivations of chapter 6. The letter, e, is used for BOTH spanwise efficiency and Oswald efficiency factors. These are NOT THE SAME. The following derivations shows the relationship between the two using es for spanwise efficiency factor and e for Oswald efficiency factor. In Anderson for a complete airplane, Where CD,0 is a constant and is parasite drag for ZERO LIFT. Other texts sometimes use different notation. CD,e is the total parasite drag for the 2 0 , , , , L D e D i D e D D rC C C C C C + = + =
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Definitions of Drag Coefficients Therefore the total drag can be expressed as a function of parasite drag, profile drag and induced drag, where es is the SPANWISE efficiency factor. The expression is simplified by defining the Oswald efficiency factor as, Reducing the Drag expression to, ( 29 2 0 , 2 2 0 , 1 L s D s L L D D C e AR r C e AR C C r C C + + = + + = π e AR e AR r s 1 1 = + e AR C C C L D D 2 0 , + =
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Aircraft Control
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style Coordinate Systems The movement of the center of mass can be in three directions: x, y, or z. These directions can either be related to the body of the airplane (body axis system) or to the relative wind (wind axis system) . Control perspective – body axis system
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style Aerodynamic perspective – wind axis system Note: Neither of the above mentioned axis systems are necessarily perpendicular or parallel to the ground.
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style Degrees of freedom (motion) Six degrees of freedom q Axial  q Normal  q Transverse q Roll q Pitch q Yaw
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style Aircraft Control – Roll, Pitch, and Yaw Axial: A Normal: N Transverse: Y Roll: L’ Pitch: M Yaw: N Nomenclature !
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AOE 2104--Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Fall 2010 Virginia Tech 7 October 2010 Lecture 9 Click to edit Master subtitle style Aircraft Control – Aft, Port, Starboard, Fore Often in Stability and Control, people refer to front, rear, left and right as port, fore, aft, and starboard.
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Lecture 9- Stability and Control - AOE 2104-Aerospace and...

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