HOA IA - Pham1 FlappersAsASymbolofIndependence...

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Pham 1 Flappers As A Symbol of Independence Stephanie Pham K. Napoleon IB History May 18, 2009
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Pham 2 Part A: For the internal assessment, the topic studied will be the 1920s. In particular, the  specific scope is how the time period can be seen as a period of social upheaval and  change in thinking, especially concerning the role of women and flappers. In other  words, how did the flappers in the Roaring Twenties symbolize modernity, and how  were they a break from traditional feminine roles??  A comparison and contrast will be  made between the ideal views of women before World War I, and how that transformed  after it ended. Additionally, the behavior of flappers, which was considered shocking at  the time, will also be looked at because it was so different from how a woman was  supposed to act in public. The investigation will be conducted mainly using internet  resources because that is the most accessible method of obtaining sources. However,  journal articles will also be used during the course of the investigation. Primary sources  from those who had an opinion on flappers will be used to have a unique perspective  from the time period itself, as well as secondary sources for a general overview. Part B: 1.  Flappers (Russell L. Johnson)
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Pham 3 Historians describe flappers as a “new woman’ with characteristics  different than that of traditional females. These young women were more  politically active, worked for wages, and open about their sexuality. The revolution began with suffrage in 1919. After the war, women knew more about to working outside of the home  and not limited to domestic duties. They participated in the same activities as men: drinking, smoking, and  going to salons. The term “flapper” referred to the tendency of the women to leave their  galoshes open, and hence, making a “flapping” sound when they walked. The traditional beauty that was ideal before WWI was known as the  “Gibson Girl,” named so because they were depicted in the artwork of  Charles Gibson. They wore long dressed with corsets cinched tightly  around their waists, placing an emphasis on their bust and hips. Their hair  was long, usually piled on top of the head. In contrast, flappers’ fashion highlighted straight lines instead of curves.  The corset was thrown away, and sometimes women wrapped their bust 
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Pham 4 in order to minimize the appearance of the breasts. The skirts were short  and exposed skin below the knee. The hairdo of choice: a short cut known  as the “bob.” Natural makeup was no longer the fashion, and flappers 
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2011 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Wormer during the Fall '08 term at Gainesville State.

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HOA IA - Pham1 FlappersAsASymbolofIndependence...

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