distributed process management - part 1 (11)

distributed process management - part 1 (11) - COP 4600...

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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 1 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn COP 4600 – Summer 2011 Introduction To Operating Systems Distributed Process Management – Part 1 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Computer Science Division University of Central Florida Instructor : Dr. Mark Llewellyn markl@cs.ucf.edu HEC 236, 407-823-2790 http://www.cs.ucf.edu/courses/cop4600/sum2011
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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 2 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Distributed Process Management In this set of notes we’ll examine some of the key mechanisms used in distributed operating systems. Process migration : the movement of an active process from one machine in the network to another machine in the network. Distributed global states : how processes on different systems can coordinate their activities when each is governed by a local clock and when the network imposes a delay in the exchange of information. Distributed mutual exclusion : how to ensure mutually exclusive access in a distributed environment. Distributed deadlock : how to prevent or detect and resolve deadlock in a distributed environment.
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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 3 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn What is a Distributed System? While many different definitions of what constitutes a distributed system have been put forth, there is general consensus that there are several central components that a distributed system must contain: A set of autonomous computers. A communication network, connecting those computers. Software which integrates these components with a communication system.
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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 4 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn What is a Distributed System? Node A Node B Node C Node D Machine limits USER Software component Communication
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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 5 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Important Characteristics of Distributed Systems Based on our simple definition, there are several important characteristics of distributed systems that need a closer look. All of these characteristics are based on the concept of transparency . In the context of information technology, the concept of transparency literally means that certain things should be invisible to the user. The manner in which the problem is solved is largely irrelevant to the user. The following transparency properties play a large role in achieving this result for the user:
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COP 4600: Intro To OS (Distributed Process Management) Page 6 © Dr. Mark Llewellyn Transparency Properties of Distributed Systems Location Transparency – users do not necessarily need to know where exactly within the system a resource is located which they wish to utilize. Resources are typically identified by name, which has no bearing on their location. Access Transparency
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course COP 4600 taught by Professor Montagne during the Summer '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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distributed process management - part 1 (11) - COP 4600...

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