chapter13 - Chapter13 PoliticalandEconomic Institutions...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 13 Political and Economic  Institutions
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter Outline Power and Authority The Nation-State Political Systems Political Power in American Society Economic Systems The Corporation Work in the Contemporary Economy
Background image of page 2
Power and Authority Economic institutions exist due to the need to produce  goods and services. Economy  – institution for carrying out            the  production and distribution of goods             and  services. Every society needs to develop some means       of  handling conflicts that occur because economic  decisions affect organizations and          the general  pubic. Political institution  – institution through which power is  obtained and exercised.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Power and Authority Power  is the ability to impose one’s          will  on others whether or not they wish  to comply.  Coercion  is power through force. Authority  is power accepted as legitimate by  those subjected to it.
Background image of page 4
Three Forms of Authority Charismatic  – arises from a leader’s personal  characteristics; magnetic personalities or the  feelings of trust they inspire (e.g. Nelson Mandela). Traditional authority  – authority in which the  legitimacy of a leader is rooted in custom (e.g.,  kings, queens). Rational-legal  – power of government officials is  based on their efforts; power       is part of a  position (e.g., president of          the U.S.).
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nation-state: Characteristics Nation-state  – is always the political authority over  a specified territory. Absolute sovereignty it has over its citizens. Citizens can appeal no higher than the laws of  the state.  Devotion to nationalism. Nationalism  – a people’s commitment        to a  common destiny based on a recognition of a  common past and a vision of a shared future.
Background image of page 6
State vs. Government state  has  ultimate authority over a territory exists as an entity Government  –  the political structure that rules a nation governmental functions are handled by groups of  officials whose roles in society are distinctly  governmental
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Nation-states are formed because they are needed  by society. Without the state to control selfish impulses of  people, there will be chaos. Durkheim believed sufficient controls need to be in  place or modern societies will experience disruptive  internal conflicts. Durkheim believes the role of the state            is to 
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 39

chapter13 - Chapter13 PoliticalandEconomic Institutions...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online