Confucianism - Crystal Ferguson REL 1103 002 Confucianism...

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Crystal Ferguson REL 1103 002 Confucianism Topic A
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Crystal M. Ferguson Professor Barb Taylor Religions of Mankind 1103 002 26 September 2011 Learning Confucianism from the Inside Out In Confucianism, family is the root to the society. Without family the world is corrupt and dysfunctional. We see a dysfunctional family and a lost boy in The Way Home. Sang Woo is a seven-year old boy, who has grown up without a father. In order for a family to be fully whole, it needs both a mother and a father. Without a father for Sang Woo, he is not fully complete. His mother has to be both parents to the young boy. She struggles with the need to teach by examples to be kind and thoughtful. Instead she hits Sang Woo when he hits her. She becomes annoyed with him on the bus ride to Grandma’s house, and tells him to shut up. All Sang Woo knows growing up is a broken family, with one parent, and it is full of disappointment and hate. While at his Grandma’s house he learns the Confucian values of Ren and the Ren tree of life, the four values of holism, harmony, humanism, and humility, Li and Yi, and also the rectification of names. One of the first ideas of Confucianism Sang Woo must learn is Ren. Ren is loving one another, benevolence, human nature, and whole heartedness (Taylor). It is an action that should come naturally to one of Confucian’s teachings. It takes Sang Woo almost a whole summer to begin to understand Ren. He goes throughout the beginning of the movie doing hateful things, like when he urinated on his grandmother’s shoes then hid them ( The Way Home) . To Sang Woo, who does not have a conscience, he sees no harm. Taking a look at Grandma, she does not accuse Sang Woo (even though I think she knows he hid her shoes) she merely goes on without.
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When grandma climbs up and down the mountain, she is barefooted, bruising and cutting her feet all along the way. She does not need shoes to be complete and have Ren. When Sang Woo finally finds love and whole heartedness, it is a new concept to him. Sang Woo takes something that is ideal to him and uses it for good. He gives up his playing cards that were so precious to him, that when Grandma stepped on them he yelled at her. On the back of those cards he drew pictures of words and sayings so Grandma would be able to write to him and tell him how she was. If she was happy, or missed him, or if she was sick, she would be able to write him, and he would know and be able to come take care of her ( The Way Home) . We see the change in Sang Woo in his actions and in his facial expressions and determination. It takes a lifetime for one to have Ren like Grandma, and Sang Woo is just starting out. Being at the base of Confucianism, family, the parent-child relationship, which is a model also for the ruler-subject relationship is crucial. One of the roots to the Jen/Ren Tree of Life (what makes up the four cardinal virtues of Confucianism) is Hsiao. Which is filial piety, love, respect, a worshipful, devoted, and full of reverence attitude to ones parents (Taylor pg.11). Sang
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Confucianism - Crystal Ferguson REL 1103 002 Confucianism...

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