loving v virginia

loving v virginia - Amendment? Yes. In a unanimous...

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Will Boas Loving v Virginia In 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia. The Lovings returned to Virginia shortly thereafter. The couple was then charged with violating the state's antimiscegenation statute, which banned inter-racial marriages. The Lovings were found guilty and sentenced to a year in jail (the trial judge agreed to suspend the sentence if the Lovings would leave Virginia and not return for 25 years). Did Virginia's antimiscegenation law violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth
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Unformatted text preview: Amendment? Yes. In a unanimous decision, the Court held that distinctions drawn according to race were generally "odious to a free people" and were subject to "the most rigid scrutiny" under the Equal Protection Clause. The Virginia law, the Court found, had no legitimate purpose "independent of invidious racial discrimination." The Court rejected the state's argument that the statute was legitimate because it applied equally to both blacks and whites and found that racial classifications were not subject to a "rational purpose" test under the Fourteenth Amendment....
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course POL 142 taught by Professor Jones during the Fall '08 term at Miami University.

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