paper 3 2001 - N01/430/S(3 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE...

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PHYSICS STANDARD LEVEL PAPER 3 Tuesday 20 November 2001 (morning) 1 hour N01/430/S(3) INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE BACCALAUR&AT INTERNATIONAL BACHILLERATO INTERNACIONAL 881-181 33 pages INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES ! Write your candidate name and number in the boxes above. ! Do not open this examination paper until instructed to do so. ! Answer all of the questions from two of the Options in the spaces provided. ! At the end of the examination, indicate the letters of the Options answered in the boxes below. Number Name TOTAL /40 TOTAL /40 TOTAL /40 /20 /20 /20 /20 /20 /20 IBCA TEAM LEADER EXAMINER OPTIONS ANSWERED
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OPTION A & MECHANICS EXTENSION A1. In our Solar system, the Moon orbits the Earth while the Earth orbits the Sun. Both orbits are approximately circular. The following diagram is not to scale. Sun Earth Moon The following tables give the masses of the Sun, Earth and Moon and their distances apart: 22 7.35 10 × Moon 24 5.98 10 × Earth 30 1.99 10 × Sun Mass / kg Body 8 3.84 10 m × Average distance from Earth to Moon: 11 1.50 10 m × Average distance from Sun to Earth (and Moon): Radius of orbit / m Measurement [2] (a) State Newton&s law of universal gravitation. ......................................................................... (This question continues on the following page) ± 2 ± N01/430/S(3) 881-181
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(Question A1 continued) [2] (b) On the diagram opposite add two arrows to show the direction of the forces which act on the Moon. [3] (c) Calculate the ratio: gravitational force on the Moon due to the EARTH gravitational force on the Moon due to the SUN ......................................................................... [3] (d) If the Earth was not present, what would be the motion of the Moon? Explain your answer. & 3 & N01/430/S(3) 881-181 Turn over
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A2. A white billiard ball moving at strikes a stationary black billiard ball. See Diagram 1. 1 0.5 m s As a result of the collision, the white ball changes its direction of motion by and its speed 30 ! becomes See Diagram 2. 1 0.2 m s . The mass of each billiard ball is 200 g. Before: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Stationary Diagram 1 After: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Diagram 2 [1] (a) On Diagram 2, add an arrow to show the direction of the total momentum of the two billiard balls after the collision. [6] (b) Calculate the speed and the direction of the black ball after collision. ......................................................................... (This question continues on the following page) & 4 & N01/430/S(3) 881-181 1 0.5 m s 1 m s v 30 ! 1 0.2 m s
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(Question A2 continued) [3] (c) Calculate the energy lost in the collision. ......................................................................... & 5 & N01/430/S(3) 881-181 Turn over
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OPTION B & ATOMIC AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS EXTENSION B1. A transmission electron microscope uses the wave properties of electrons to study things too small to be observed using an optical microscope. A potential difference is used to accelerate the electrons into a beam. If the de Broglie wavelength of the electrons in a particular beam is 10 1.0 10 m, × [2] (a) calculate the momentum of an electron in the beam. ......................................................................... [3] (b) calculate the kinetic energy of an electron in the beam. [2] (c) calculate the accelerating potential difference.
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