Lecture.Packet.1.Introduction - CEE 440 FATE AND CLEANUP OF...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: CEE 440 FATE AND CLEANUP OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS Lecture 1 Professor Charles J. Werth Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign © 2011 University of Illinois Board of Trustees. All rights reserved. CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 2 CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS My teaching goals for Chapter 1 are for you to learn: 1) sources and types of environmental pollutants 2) scope of the hazardous waste sites in the US 3) magnitude of the effort required to clean up polluted sites CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 3 1.1 SOURCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS 1) Legacy environmental pollutants released to the environment at a point source through mismanagement, i.e., hazardous waste 2) Nonpoint source pollutants released to the environment (small in quantity locally, but large in quantity regionally or globally) As Engineers, we are often concerned with the risk associated with and cleanup of hazardous waste. We want to also understand the fate of non-point source pollutants and ways to mitigate their impact. CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 4 1.2 HAZARDOUS WASTE DEFINITION: Wastes [solids, sludges, liquids, and containerized gases] that pose a substantial present or potential hazard to humans or other living organisms because: 1) such wastes are nondegradable or persistent in nature 2) they can be biologically magnified 3) they can be lethal, or 4) they may otherwise cause or tend to cause detrimental cumulative effects (from Wagner, T. P., Hazardous Waste Regulations, 2 nd ed., Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1991) CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 5 1. 2. 3. 4. Perception of Risk Actual Risk Perception of Future Risk Actual Potential for Future Risk 1.3 MOTIVATION FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE REMEDIATION These motivation factors stem from our inability to define risks with any degree of accuracy. Currently, risk assessment is more of a methodology than an actual assessment of the risk posed to humans and ecosystems. CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 6 1.4 Landmark Episodes that Motivated Concern for the Environment and Hazardous Waste Legislation 1.4.1 Silent Spring, 1972 A book by Rachel Carson discussing the real and potential dangers that hazardous wastes pose to humans. Ms. Carson showed the interconnectedness of all life by explaining how DDT residues could be found in deep-sea squid, Antarctic penguins, and the fatty tissues of people all over the world. CEE 440 © 2011 Charles J. Werth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. All rights reserved. 7 1.4.2 Love Canal 1890’s: Mr. William Love planned a utopian community to be powered by hydroelectric power. by hydroelectric power....
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 27

Lecture.Packet.1.Introduction - CEE 440 FATE AND CLEANUP OF...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online