L#1-3 phase distribution - 3 Phase Distribution Masoud...

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Unformatted text preview: 3 Phase Distribution Masoud Fathizadeh, PhD, PE Department of Engineering Technology Purdue Calumet Hammond, Indiana 43323 3 Phase Power Distribution and Transmission 3 phase electricity distribution is the process in the delivery of 3 phase power from the generation equipment to the business or location for use. This include the transmission over power lines, possibly through electrical substations and pole-mounted transformers, and the appropriate distribution 3 phase wiring and sometimes electricity meters. 3 Phase Power Distribution and Transmission Generating 3 Phase Power From Single Phase When single phase power is readily available but 3-phase power is not already allocated, there is an easy way to generate 3 phase power with a 3 phase power generating Rotary Phase Converter or with a modern Motor Generator Set. Today these are a super efficient method to get 3 phase power anywhere single phase is already available. Solid State super efficient 3 phase generating Rotary Phase Converters here can do the job. Electric Power Distribution History In the early days of electricity generation, direct current (DC) generators would be connected to loads at the same voltage. The generation, transmission and loads all needed to be of the same voltage because, at the time, there was not a common way of doing DC voltage conversion (other than motor-generator sets which today have became super efficient). The voltages usually had to be fairly low with old generation systems due to the difficulty and danger of distributing high voltages to small loads. The losses in a line transmission cable are proportional to the square of the current, the length of the cable, and the resistive nature of the conductor line wire material, and are inversely proportional to cross-sectional area. Early power transmission networks were already using copper, which is one of the best conductors that is also very economically feasible for this application. To reduce the current while keeping power transmission constant requires increasing the voltage which, as previously mentioned, was, at that time, problematic. This meant in order to keep losses to a reasonable level the (DC) Edison power transmission system needed thick cables and local power generators. Alternating Current (AC) Becomes Most Common Standard Soon, the adoption of alternating current (AC) for electricity generation dramatically changed the situation. Power transformers, installed at power substations, could be used to raise the voltage from the generators and reduce it to supply loads. Increasing the voltage reduced the current in the power transmission and distribution lines. Thus the size of conductors required and distribution losses incurred were also reduced. This made it more economic to distribute power over long distances. The ability to transform to extra-high voltages enabled power generators to be located far from loads with transmission systems to interconnect generating stations and distribution networks. from loads with transmission systems to interconnect generating stations and distribution networks....
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2011 for the course ECET 331 taught by Professor Tim during the Summer '11 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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L#1-3 phase distribution - 3 Phase Distribution Masoud...

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