Ch 8 Summary - 292 The Silicon Web: Physics for the...

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292 The Silicon Web: Physics for the Internet Age SUMMARY AND LOOK FORWARD In this chapter, we studied several main ideas about signals and information. We can represent a time-varying signal as either an analog (continuous) variation of voltage, or as a digital (discrete) variation of voltage. In the analog representation, the voltage directly follows the signal voltage. In the digital representation, the signal is sampled , or measured, at selected times and a number represents the value of each sample. In modern communication systems, the sampled values are represented using binary numbers. When data are transmitted across a communication channel, the sender and receiver must agree on a certain protocol —a set of rules by which the numbers will be formatted, sent, and interpreted. We discussed analog and digital radio, both of which use the technique of fre- quency multiplexing to send separate streams of information using different channels. Broadcasting stations operate on different carrier frequencies. Each radio station is allowed a F xed band (or range) of frequencies. The width of the range of frequencies allocated is called the bandwidth of the allocated channel. The larger (wider) the band-
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This note was uploaded on 09/29/2011 for the course PHYS 222 taught by Professor Wade during the Spring '09 term at Edmonds Community College.

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Ch 8 Summary - 292 The Silicon Web: Physics for the...

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