lecture 2 - ME 330 Engineering Materials Lecture 2 Tensile...

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Lecture 2 Tensile Properties Stephen D. Downing Mechanical Science and Engineering © 2001 - 2010 University of Illinois Board of Trustees, All Rights Reserved ME 330 Engineering Materials
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 1 of 43 This Lecture . .. ± Elastic properties ± Yield-point behavior ± Plastic deformation ± True vs. Engineering stress ± Stress-strain curves ± Fracture surfaces ± Hardness Testing
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 2 of 43 Next Lecture . .. ± Case Study – Shaft in Torsion ± Bending Tests ± Chemistry review ± Statistics Please read chapters 2 & 3 Please read chapters 2 & 3
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 3 of 43 Notes About Lab ± Be 5 Minutes Early ± Read Lab Material Before Class ± Lab Notebook ± Loose Leaf Binder ± Bring to Lab (you may be quizzed) ± Reports Must Be Concise ± Clear Graphics in the Report ± Properly Formatted Equations ± Don’t Include Raw Data Tables ± Deduct Points for Fluff ± Fewer, Clearer Sentences ± Follow The Suggested Format
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 4 of 43 Where We Are Going. .. ± Engineers design products to carry loads, transmit forces, etc. ± Characterize a material’s behavior through properties ± Measure properties in lab test … extrapolate behavior to different scenario ± Alternative is proof testing everything! ± Basic mechanical testing ± Look for response to applied forces, so ± Apply load, measure deformation ± Indent surface, measure hardness ± Quantify words like “strong”, “ductile”, “hard”, etc
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 5 of 43 Basic Mechanical Tests ± Tension ± Most common mechanical test ± Gage section reduced to ensure deflection here ± Load cell measures applied load ± Extensometer ensures Δ L measured from gage region ± Compression ± Similar to tensile test ± Good for brittle specimens … hard to grip ± Often much different properties in compression ± Torsion ± Test of pure shear ± Member twisted by angle θ , calculate shear strain ± Measure applied torque, calculate shear stress ± In all cases ± Displacement is applied and you measure load ± Calculate stress from measured load ± Calculate strain from change in gage length
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 6 of 43 Tension Test Measure load and displacement Compute stress and strain
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ME 330 – Lecture 2 © 2010 Stephen Downing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, All Rights Reserved 7 of 43 Review of Stress and Strain ± Stress: force per unit area ± Traditional units: MPa or ksi ± A o is original area ± A is instantaneous area ± Strain: “relative” change in length ±
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lecture 2 - ME 330 Engineering Materials Lecture 2 Tensile...

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