Construction+Issues+250511

Construction+Issues+250511 - Construction Issues Impact of...

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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (c) 2011 1 Construction Issues: Impact of prefabrication on design and construction Productivity measurement and improvement
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Prefabrication: Big Ideas Pre-fabrication and pre-assembly are the best methods to reduce on-site assembly duration, but must be considered during design and engineering efforts Effective and efficient execution of pre-fabrication and pre- assembly strategies requires the early involvement of specialists Strategies to optimize supply flows depend on the type of flow: made-to-stock, made-to-order, and engineered-to-order (c) 2011 2
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Pre-Fabrication & Pre-Assembly Pre-fabrication refers to operations associated with measuring and cutting, bending, pre-making holes, etc. prior to assembly (independently of where assembly occurs) Pre-assembly refers to operations associated with putting together two or more building components prior to final assembly on site (can include testing procedures) (c) 2011 3
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Where do Pre-Fabrication & Pre-Assembly Occur? (c) 2011 4 design detailed engineering fabrication & assembly delivery construction what are the implications for design & engineering?
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Reasons to prefabricate • Product – Higher quality – Easier quality control – For designs with lots of repetition – For unique or geometrically complex designs • Process – Shift work hours from field to shop – Shift work hours from perilous conditions to the ground • More productive • Safer – Enabled pooled (independent, parallel) production of parts and systems
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Integrated Detailing – Fabrication - Erection Interlocking Collars – Speed in Assembly Connection Tolerance : 0.006” (0.15 mm) Beam welding : 5 min 35 sec (typical: 180 min); 0.2% rejects (typical 5-8% rejects), 97% time improvement Lead time : days vs. months Construction : 10,000 sf (~1,000 m2) per day up to 9 stories (4,000 sf with stairs, railing, etc.), often 6 months overall savings
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Case Study - Challenges 3,000 workers on site on a daily basis Limited lay down space onsite - approximately One Day – or less!! Single point of access to the site One of the most congested traffic conditions in the EU Working Hours Deliveries – 0900-1700; 1900-2300 Security – highly secure site environment (c) 2010 8
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (c) 2011 9 Target: 75% of rebar elements pre-fabricated and pre-assembled
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Pre-Fabrication & Pre-Assembly Rebar Strategy (c) 2011 10
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering Pre-Assembly Drawings (c) 2011 11
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (c) 2011 12
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Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (c) 2011 13
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(c) 2011 14
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course CEE 100 taught by Professor Fischer during the Spring '11 term at Stanford.

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Construction+Issues+250511 - Construction Issues Impact of...

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