Introduction+280311

Introduction+280311 - ,e.g,...

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1 Consider other team activities, e.g., a symphony orchestra or a basketball team or a football team. When playing, those teams want to give successful performances (which are measured differently, of course, e.g., sales on iTunes or good reviews in the paper for the orchestra, and a win for the sports team). Consider what such a team and its management can control to make it as likely as possible to give a strong performance. It can select certain team members and not others; it can decide how to organize itself; it can decide how to prepare for a performance (i.e., what process to follow, what work and collaboration environment to create); it can set goals and give incentives. These are pretty much the levers (controllable factors) a team has to give itself the best shot at giving a good performance. This is the same for teams that work together to create a building or a bridge or another physical product that becomes part of the built environment. The owner of a building (the people, business, or government agency driving the development of a building) can select one or the other architect or energy consultant or builder, just like an orchestra can pick a particular viola player or a basketball coach a particular point guard that the team manager or owner believes is in the best position to help give a great performance. The owner and the team can then decide how and when to work together, what rules they want to follow (often called a team charter), what performance to reward, what performance to punish, etc. All these decisions are made with the performance of the building in mind, of course, so the goal typically is to get the “best bang for the buck.” The question becomes what “bang” is needed and how much “buck” is available from what sources.
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Hence, achieving more sustainable buildings depends first and foremost on how the project team is set up (composed) and organized and how it works together (the processes it follows). CEE100 focuses on the methods to design a project organization and process that make it as likely as possible to create a sustainable (high performing) building. I.e., the class focuses on how to create the playbook for a project team. It doesn’t focus on building or infrastructure (product) design, which is covered in CEE courses with numbers in the 130, 160, 170, and 180 mostly. 1
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2 The goal for today is for students to gain an understanding of the scope and approach to the class. Schedule details and mechanics will be discussed on Wednesday. EEE: Economy, Environment, Equity (equity refers to social equity, i.e., project should be equitable to all project stakeholders; a stakeholder is someone with a significant interest in the project or someone who is impacted in significant ways by the project) POP: Product, Organization, Process FFB: Function, Form, Behavior (as in classic design theory, e.g., based on Louis Sullivan’s famous phrase “form ever follows function” in his March 1896 article on “the tall office
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Introduction+280311 - ,e.g,...

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