Business Ethics Research Paper

Business Ethics Research Paper - Sweatshops in the clothing...

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Sweatshops in the clothing industry 1 Business Ethics Research Paper: Sweatshops in the clothing industry Pavol Burinsky BC 306 Christopher S. Eley, M.B.A. Business Ethics Research Paper February 27, 2011
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Sweatshops in the clothing industry 2 Sweatshops create lot of debate around the globe. For many people they are highly unethical and others feel that sweatshops do not cause any harm at all. Regardless all the anti- sweatshops activity, pro-sweatshops organizations are persuaded that sweatshops provide better than average job in third-world countries and that without sweatshops people could die because otherwise it would be hard to provide living for their families. Many popular clothing industries around the world work hard to produce new designs for their goods but the real work actually happens in sweatshops located thousands of miles away from their headquarters. Sweatshop is considered to be a manufacturing facility where working environment is very dangerous with health and safety standards ignored. People who work in sweatshops are under mental abuse, working long hours every day and sometime even overtime for few cents per hour in very poor conditions. Very often there is no running water or working toilets and extreme exploitation. Many of sweatshops are also involved with the human trafficking and child labor which makes this ethical issue even more tragic (Bocco, n.d.). Every day we buy clothes made all over the globe, things we need, like and look good on us but we rarely think about where those outfits came from and about the people who made them and under what condition those things were made. Popular multinational clothing company Nike pays Tiger Woods the best golf player on the planet (also the richest one) millions of dollars a year to be the face of Nike clothing but men working in sweatshops, real faces of Nike get less than five dollars a days to live in extremely poor conditions with safety hazards and no medical attention when needed. Large corporations use sweatshops to make huge profits on the cheap labor in third world countries where there is no or very little law labor control. It is important to mention that those big brand clothing companies can afford the costs involved with improvements and raising wages without changing their retail price.
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Sweatshops in the clothing industry 3 After a decade of denying poor working conditions in sweatshops it has become bigger issue since many unsatisfied people started to speak up and anti-sweatshop organizations such as National Labor Committee and International Labor Rights Fund entered as well. Companies like Nike and Gap admitted that the workers in sweatshops in developed countries worked in inhuman conditions for wages being way below minimum. Just few years ago these and other big brand names in clothing industry dismissed any allegations against them brought by anti- sweatshop campaigners. After revealing sweatshops workers conditions both Nike and Gap promised to make sure ethical codes of conduct will be followed in every factory they owe. Gap
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course ECON 202 taught by Professor Picakova during the Spring '10 term at City University of Seattle.

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Business Ethics Research Paper - Sweatshops in the clothing...

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