ED 100 Section 4 - ED 100 Section 4 Wirth, Louis. (1956)...

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ED 100 Section 4 Wirth, Louis. (1956) Sociological Significance of The Ghetto - Wirth uses the analogy of neighboring culture groups like “Chinatowns” and Little Italy’s to make a point about the relationship between social groups who physically live near each other, but do not interact. As Wirth puts it they “live side by side without one another” (Wirth 282). This is a discussion of externality, and is understood through the idea that accommodation (living side by side without interacting) is different that assimilation (where the two groups would co-operate and thrive together). This then leads to a theme of boarders, either tangible or implied that result in segregation leads to the inclusive or exclusive creation of community. An interesting closing point by Wirth is that the segregation of Jews in the Ghetto actually led to the survival of their culture and social identity. Sennett, Richard. (1994) Fear of Touching – The Jewish Ghetto in Renaissance Venice
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course ENV DES 100 taught by Professor Marcocenzatti during the Spring '11 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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ED 100 Section 4 - ED 100 Section 4 Wirth, Louis. (1956)...

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