Topic 9 - passes, and the rates of increase and decrease...

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*EXPLORING RATE CHANGE IN MOTIONS* In this topic, you learned how a skateboarder's movement in front of a motion detector could help you understand the concept of rate. You learned that graphs can tell you something about rate. A constant rate of change is represented by a straight line. A slower speed is indicated by a flatter graph. A faster speed is indicated by a steeper graph. ** In a situation involving motion, a positive rate of change means that distance from the motion detector is increasing as time passes, and you see this in the rising graph. No movement means that distance is not changing as time passes, and the rate of change is 0. You see this on a graph as a horizontal (or flat) line. In a situation involving motion, a negative rate of change means that distance is decreasing as time passes, and you see this in a falling line on the graph. Sometimes, the rate of change is not constant . Then the graph is not a line. In a motion situation, distance increases and then decreases as time
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Unformatted text preview: passes, and the rates of increase and decrease are not constant. *** When you have data for a motion situation, you can compute the rate of change between any two points. For example, for the data shown at the left, the rate of change from 0 seconds to 2 seconds is: Remember that, when stating the rate of change, you must always use units. **** As you solve problems, remember that you can answer questions by looking at graphs closely to see if they show a rate of change that is positive, negative, or constant. You can also find the rate from the graph by comparing the vertical and horizontal changes from one point on the graph to another. And, if you have the data that the graph represents, you can subtract values to find the rate of change. In the next topic, you will continue to learn about rate in situations that are different from walking in front of a motion detector....
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course ALCOHOLEDU 1 taught by Professor Berkeley during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Topic 9 - passes, and the rates of increase and decrease...

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