Bacteria___Protistas_SPRING_2011[1]

Bacteria___Protistas_SPRING_2011[1] - March 15, 2011...

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March 15, 2011 Science Headlines Bacteria & Protistas
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Bacteria disappearing from our bodies may harm human health February, Boston Globe Staff CAMBRIDGE - Not feeling quite yourself? No wonder. In a sense, you aren't really you. Scientists estimate that 90 percent of the cells contained in the human body belong to nonhuman organisms - mostly bacteria, but also a smattering of fungi and other teensy entities. Some 100 trillion microbes nestle in niches from our teeth to our toes. But what's setting science on its heels these days is not the boggling numbers of bugs so much as the recognition that they are much more than casual hitchhikers capable of causing disease. They may be so essential to well-being that humans couldn't live without them .
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We're not individuals, we're colonies of creatures ," said Bruce Birren, director of microbial sequencing at the Broad Institute, a research center affiliated with Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His team is part of a newly launched effort by the US National Institutes of Health to map the DNA and complete the first comprehensive census of microbial species that are inseparable from human existence. " We can't take nutrition properly without bacteria . We can't fight bad germs without good germs ," he said. "It may turn out that secretions from bacteria affect not only long-term health, but hour-by-hour moods -- could a person's happiness depend on his or her bugs? It's possible. Our existences are so incredibly intertwined ."
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Antibiotics may make fighting flu harder Science News Monday, March 14th, 2011 Taking antibiotics when they aren’t necessary could make the flu or other viral infections worse , a new study suggests. Mice on antibiotics can’t fight the flu as well as mice that haven’t taken the drugs, say researchers from Yale. Antibiotics (interfere with) the immune system’s infection- fighting power by killing friendly bacteria living in the intestines , the researchers report. These friendly , or ―commensal,‖ bacteria help defend against viruses by keeping the immune system on al ert for viral invaders, the team discovered.
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this strange union may be headed for trouble because of overuse of antibiotics and antiseptic lifestyles that deter the transfer of vital strains of bacteria that have swarmed in our systems at least since early humans ventured out of Africa. Some strains of bacteria are disappearing from humans , and may be linked to germ-destroying substances in everything from hankies to hamburger. "We're seeing the equivalent of global warming in the human ecosystem," said Dr. Martin J. Blaser, professor of microbiology and chairman of the department of medicine at New York University. "Changes of huge magnitude are occurring over a few generations. Nature famously abhors a vacuum - the bacteria disappearing from our systems . .. might be replaced by organisms that aren't nearly as
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This note was uploaded on 10/03/2011 for the course ISB 202 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Bacteria___Protistas_SPRING_2011[1] - March 15, 2011...

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