Fungi_SPRING_2011[1]

Fungi_SPRING_2011[1] - March 24, 2011 Fungi Fungi These are...

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March 24, 2011 “Fungi”
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Fungi These are somewhat higher on the kingdom tree. -- but may be lower on your body. Most are multicelled. All are heterotrophs . Secrete enzymes that digest food outside their bodies. -- Then they absorb it. May be parasites or saprophytes . (???) They play a huge role in decomposition. Mention “fungus” and most people think of what? Mushrooms!! But, there are many different shapes, colors and sizes.
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Shelf fungus on decaying log Cup fungus Bridal veil fungus SHELF FUNGUS
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CORAL FUNGUS BIG LAUGHING MUSHROOM Many are very attractive (in their own way)!
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NEVER EAT UNIDENTIFIED MUSHROOMS!! Why? (Many are very toxic.) TRUMPET CHANTARELLE SCARLET HOOD
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Fungi likely arose from Protistas. When? Over 900 mya Proterozoic Eon -- Origin of Protistas, Fungi, and Animals --Which came first, plants or animals? Kingdom “tree”
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What is their structure? Hyphae – slender filaments; form a “furry” network called a mycelium . Hyphae –secrete enzymes that digest food outside their structure. --With many fungi, hyphae intertwine to form a reproductive structure that produces spores. --We call it a mushroom . --Spores blow about and “germinate” when they find a host site.
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nuclear fusion meiosis cytoplasmic fusion Diploid Stage Haploid Stage Club-shaped structures having two nuclei ( n + n ) form at the margin of each gill. gills After cytoplasmic fusion, a “dikaryotic” ( n + n ) mycelium gives rise to spore-bearing bodies (e.g., mushrooms). cap
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Fungi_SPRING_2011[1] - March 24, 2011 Fungi Fungi These are...

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