History 5 Lecture 17 - History 5 Lecture 17 Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: History 5 Lecture 17 Introduction Romanticism can be imagined in part as a counter-enlightenment Reason is not the fundamental tool for humanity Emotion plays a big part Rejected the universalizing principles The world isnt constructed through mathematical laws that are the same everywhere Romanticism is also in part counter-industrialization Rejected the claim that technology could make the world a better place Romanticism generated a political movement: Nationalism Romanticism: Counter-Enlightenment and Counter-Industrialization Origins of Romanticism Can be found before the industrial revolution in response to the Enlightenment Emphasis on rationality seemed to rob human beings our sense of awe The sublime: what is overpowering and majestic and immense beyond human comprehension Expands the range of aesthetic beauty, to include inconceivable disorder New emphasis on emotions in literature, especially in German lit Goethe The Sorrows of the Young Wether [1774] Passionate temperament of the title character is put forward as the very essence of his humanity Reason is unable to experience this Emerges in the aftermath of the Fr. Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Against the ideas that were seen to have produced the revolution: rationality New emphasis on creativity on spontaneity Genius: heightened sensitivity and great creative powers, no longer bound by rules John Keats here lies one whose names was writ in water Humanity and Nature Enlightenment: nature is put down to a science, laws and math Reformation: nature is always changing, something that is out of the grasp of humans For politics, there is an idea that freedom through nature rather than through civilization Romanticism and spirituality Reemergence of religion in European life Not concerned with theology but with spirituality Idea of authentic soul that can commute with God About feeling and faith, not reason and theology Neo-medievalism Most of the art is neo-medieval a lot about nature in the art Environmentalism Humanitys connection to nature has been broken through industrialization A sort of self-critique, most romantics are only able to write and...
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History 5 Lecture 17 - History 5 Lecture 17 Introduction...

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