Bill brady handouts spring 2009

Bill brady handouts spring 2009 - Resume Preparation Guides...

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Resume Preparation Guides The resume is a marketing document designed to sell your background and skills to a targeted reader. No. 1 More is not better, enough is needed You need to provide enough detail but, avoid data dump. Concise resumes are not an autobiography. No. 2 Remember the reader and what makes the reader want to see more. You have less than 30 seconds to attract the reader’s attention. Lead with what specifically sells you to the reader. No. 3 The resume’s appearance attracts, but it’s the content that holds. Be Consistent – A good resume is readable. Exercise restraint – There should be some white space (not too much). Avoid odd and/or hard- to-read type styles. Limit length – Show readers that you have the skills they want. It is very hard to convince them to buy something you have that they don’t need. No. 4 Objectives are objectionable if they don’t add meaning or enhancement. If there is doubt, leave the objective out. Marriott School Business Career Center Spring 2009 1
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No. 5 Education is what you are selling. List your degrees properly (normally highest degree first) No. 6 Experience is what sells you. Relate your experience to: Key job skills (showing you know the job). Attributes the employer seeks (showing you know the employer). Articulate your skills (showing you know yourself). Your previous employers and positions, especially when they are clients or competitors of the employer, make you attractive. No. 7 Focus on Accomplishments More than ever the resume focus must be on RESULTS. Demonstrate how hiring you will benefit the employer. Use key words. Use action to get action; express your experience using action verbs (see list). Avoid “responsible for” and declarative sentences like “I did this….” Relate mission and extracurricular experiences from a business skills context: self-motivation, training, leadership, interpersonal skills, time management, planning, cultural tolerance, dedication, hard work, adaptability, and perseverance. Marriott School Business Career Center Spring 2009 2
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No. 8 No formatting option is any better than another. Remember the 5 “C”s – Clean, Clear, Consistent, Concise, Conservative Left aligned is most common Reverse chronological order is expected (most recent experience first) Bullets add emphasis and accessibility Golden Triangle – weight in upper left Absolutely NO misspelling or typos Use present tense for current experience and past tense for past No. 9 One page is good; two pages are minimally needed; avoid multi-pages. After your draft ask the following: Can I cut out any paragraphs? Can I cut out any sentences? Can I cut out any superfluous words? Are there any repetitions? Keep your paper white, light cream or gray.
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Bill brady handouts spring 2009 - Resume Preparation Guides...

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