Domestication2010

Domestication2010 - Domestication Domestication is genetic,...

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Domestication
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Domestication is genetic, not simply behavioral Thus, domestication results in a change in the gene pool of a population. A changed genotype is reflected in a change in the phenotype We have proposed many theories on how or why the domestication process occurred Archaeology can supply some hypotheses or answers, since nearly ALL domestication occurred in prehistoric times I’ll talk first about domestication of plants as an example
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What/when is a domesticated plant? Sunflower
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What is a wild plant ? Wild ginseng
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Passionfruit or maypop What is a weed?
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How did domestication come about?
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When and Where did domestication come about?
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WILD PLANT does NOT like disturbed habitats Lady’s slipper
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WEEDY PLANT DOMESTICATE like to grow in disturbed habitats Here’s my driveway . . . and I didn’t need to plant or even water to get these weeds! Wood sorrel, Oxalis
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Weed Very good at re-seeding without any help Little barley, Hordeum pusillum Notice the brittle rachis, or stem: when each seed is ripe, it breaks off and falls to the ground When the wind hits the awns (projections), the seed vibrates and plants itself in the dirt
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Domesticate Reduced seed dispersal ability maize, Zea mays Some domesticated plants no longer (or rarely) produce seeds at all! -- for example, banana or sweet potato They have become dependent on humans
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Weed Domesticate Has dormancy Lacks dormancy Archaeological clue: Thick seed coat Thinner seed coat Dormancy is the ability of the seed to lie in the ground but not germinate for several to many years. chenopod
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Weed Domesticate Ripening Staggered on between plants Simultaneous Little barley, Hordeum pusillum Sunflower, Helianthus annuus ripe not ripe
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Weed Domesticate
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This note was uploaded on 10/04/2011 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Simmons during the Spring '06 term at South Carolina.

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Domestication2010 - Domestication Domestication is genetic,...

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