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Primate BehaviorA2009

Primate BehaviorA2009 - PRIMATE BEHAVIOR Increased emphasis...

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PRIMATE BEHAVIOR Increased emphasis on learning (vs. instinctive behavior) compared to other mammals. Primates spend a greater proportion of their life growing up, both biologically and socially Offspring require a long period of parental care.
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Why do anthropologists study non-human primate behavior? Primate behavior studies are seen as models for early human behavior, or for the origin of such behaviors. Primates and humans share ancestors, so behavior may be homologous . The two primates used most often for interpreting origin of human behavior have been Baboon ( analogous : terrestrial with arboreal ancestry) and Chimpanzee ( homologous ) Early studies were done in the laboratory and zoos. Since 1970s in the wild.
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Primates recognize individuals, and each individual holds a certain status within the dominance hierarchy of the group. Primate social systems are maintained through communication : * Facial expressions * Vocalizations * Body language * Touch (Goodall 1986:135)
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(Goodall 1986:120) Facial expressions Jane Goodall has documented chimpanzee facial expressions
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(Turnbaugh et al. 2002:154) Full closed grin (fear/excitement) (Goodall 1986:121) Compressed lips (aggression) (Goodall 1986:123)
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(Goodall 1986:129) Vocalizations Among chimpanzees, vocalizations are closely bound to emotion -- i.e., can’t make the sound without experiencing the emotion Calls are elicited by or directed toward: 1) Individuals in the same party; 2) Community members in different parties; 3) Individuals of a neighbor community; 4) Nonanimate environmental stimuli; 5) Animals of other species Chimpanzee mothers recognize the screams of their own offspring
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Goodall 1986:127) (Goodall 1986:123, 129)
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(Goodall 1986:127)
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