Dating Additional Spr 2010

Dating Additional Spr 2010 - Additional Relative and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Additional Relative and Absolute Dating Techniques Relative: Seriation (stylistic and frequency) Bone chemistry (e.g., fluorine analysis) Absolute: Dendrochronology Archaeomagnetism briefly, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relative dating technique Seriation: as human behavior changes through time, so does its material products. Seriation is a technique to order artifacts in sequence. Stylistic seriation: Order one kind of artifact by similarities in style. Change reflects temporal change or spatial distance. Frequency seriation: Order assemblages by relative frequencies of artifact styles. We assume a rise and fall in popularity of styles through time.
Background image of page 2
Stylistic seriation Order artifacts by similarities in style, which reflects temporal change or spatial distance.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stylistic seriation looks at one kind of artifact (prom dresses, cars, beer cans, etc.) and is illustrated by pictures Frequency seriation , on the other hand, looks at assemblages (collections) and is illustrated by bar charts of percents (frequencies) put together to form “battleship-shaped curves” (So instead of just prom dresses, it would be women’s clothing, vehicles, containers, etc.)
Background image of page 4
Frequency seriation Order assemblages by relative frequencies of artifact styles. We assume a rise and fall in popularity of styles through time.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
a type of bone chemistry analysis, it is based on the idea that bones at any one location will absorb minerals (such as fluorine) at the same rate. Thus, older bones will have more fluorine, and younger bones will have less at any one location. Relative dating of bone can be done with other elements, such as uranium (increases with age) or nitrogen (decreases with age). Bone chemistry analyses:
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/04/2011 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Simmons during the Spring '06 term at South Carolina.

Page1 / 27

Dating Additional Spr 2010 - Additional Relative and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online