ethics paper - Alex Gase ACC 343- Ethics Paper The changing...

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Alex Gase ACC 343- Ethics Paper The changing expectations and diversity of business has created ethical implications in the workplace. Not only do managers, employees, and other constituents have to know what is legal, but they must also know what is ethical. With many modern examples in business ethics we have found there to be a noticeable rift between the two. Ethical malpractice in business has always been an issue, but only within the last twenty years have there been events of such magnitude. Examples such as the scandals of WorldCom, Enron/Arthur Andersen, and Adelphia have caused the creation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which raised the standards for management of firms and for public accounting firms. This act has helped guide business decision-making to provide for a more ethical business environment. Though its standards were set for managers and executives the accountability of meeting these standards have trickled down to all employees and pertinent constituents. Ethical dilemmas are prevalent in everyday business practice whether it is as small as colluding with employees in liberally using business expense vouchers or as big as using tax shelters to help clients dodge $2.5 billion in taxes like KPMG (IRS, 2005). When I enter the workforce full-time I am almost certain I will encounter an ethical dilemma within my first couple of years.
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ethics paper - Alex Gase ACC 343- Ethics Paper The changing...

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