Chapter 15-2

Chapter 15-2 - velocity with respect to time μ υ F = F= Force applied to the string μ= Linear Mass Density This also works in many general cases

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Sound frequencies over 20 kHz are called ultrasound. When used to map a baby in the womb, these waves travel through tissue at approximately 1500 m/s. For a good image, the wavelength should be no more than 1.0mm. What frequency sound is required for a good scan?
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1) Is it possible, then, to use ultrasound to map something much smaller in the body? (How about an individual cell?) What would be required to do this? 2) What might make an ultrasound not as effective, in terms of things that could vary from person to person?
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) cos( ) , ( t kx A t x y ϖ - = To describe the position of a wave in 1 Dimension, when I plug in a horizontal position and time:
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) sin( ) , ( ) , ( t kx A t t x y t x v ϖ - = = To find the velocity, take the partial derivative with respect to time:
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) , ( ) cos( ) , ( ) , ( 2 2 t x y t kx A t t x v t x a ϖ - = - - = = To find the acceleration, take the partial derivative of
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Unformatted text preview: velocity with respect to time: μ υ F = F= Force applied to the string μ= Linear Mass Density This also works in many general cases! 2 λ n L = The Human Ear can hear tones between 20 Hz and 20 kHz. When tuning a piano, the smallest frequency difference a human ear can hear is approximately 1.3 Hz. Create a musical instrument from one string which can create every possible tone a human can want to hear. a) How many tones are there? b) How long is string at the longest tone? c) How long is the string at the shortest tone? d) How much does the string length have to change to change tones? How would I create the same instrument for the wind section?...
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2011 for the course PHYS 4c taught by Professor Parsons,b during the Fall '08 term at Saddleback.

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Chapter 15-2 - velocity with respect to time μ υ F = F= Force applied to the string μ= Linear Mass Density This also works in many general cases

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