2.2 - Binomial Probability Distribution (Solutions)

2.2 - Binomial Probability Distribution (Solutions) - 2.2...

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2.2 – Binomial Probability Distribution 1 Section 2.2 Binomial Probability Distribution BINOMIAL PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS 3 CONDITIONS FOR BINOMIAL EXPERIMENT 1) Only two possible outcomes 2) Binomial Random Variable is the number of successes in a fixed number of trials 3) Each trial is independent P(Success) = p P(Failure) = P(Success) is the same for every trial P(Failure) is the same for every trial SUCCESS or FAILURE * 1 - p = q
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2.2 – Binomial Probability Distribution 2 SAMPLING WITHOUT REPLACEMENT? If we sample an object until it’s failure point, to see if it is defective, have we affected the sample space? Is P(Success) for the next selected object exactly the same? Therefore the experiment is NOT truly binomial BINOMIAL DISTRIBUTION can still be used if the sample is no more than 5% of the population YES NO # of trials MEAN OF A BINOMIAL DISTRIBUTION np μ npq σ STANDARD DEVIATION OF A BINOMIAL DISTRIBUTION n = p = q = P(Success) P(Failure)
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2.2 – Binomial Probability Distribution
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This note was uploaded on 10/04/2011 for the course MATH 1175 taught by Professor Jenny during the Spring '10 term at Fanshawe.

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2.2 - Binomial Probability Distribution (Solutions) - 2.2...

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