CV response to exercise PPE

CV response to exercise PPE - 10/4/2011 Cardiovascular...

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10/4/2011 1 Cardiovascular Response to Exercise Learning Objectives Review the structure and function of the heart and vascular system. Find out how the cardiovascular system responds to increased demands during exercise. Discuss cardiovascular adaptations to exercise training. 4 Major Cardiovascular Functions 1. Delivery (e.g., oxygen, hormones, and nutrients) 2. Removal (e.g., carbon dioxide and waste products) 3. Maintenance (e.g., body temperature, pH) 4. Prevention (e.g., infection—immune function)
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10/4/2011 2 Efficient Transport System Adequate volume of delivery (cardiac output) Total flow must vary with demand (“rest to Everest”) Total flow must be divertable Delivery must be continuous, non pulsatile, and maintained at an adequate pressure Cardiovascular System There are 3 Components: 1. A pump the heart 2. A system of channels the blood vessels 3. A fluid medium blood Anatomy of the heart Video
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10/4/2011 3 The Heart as a Pump The two atria receive blood into the heart (from venous side) Pump blood into the ventricles The two ventricles send blood from the heart to the rest of the body. The right ventricle (RV) sends blood to the lungs (pulmonary) for oxygenation. The left ventricle (LV) sends blood to the body (systemic). The amount of blood pumped out of the heart each minute is cardiac output Cardiac Output (Q) = Heart rate (HR)×Stroke Volume (SV) HR–beats per minute SV–volume of blood ejected per beat Is LV filling really almost entirely passive with just a little kick from the Atria? video So what else contributes to LV filling? LV suction LV rotation/torsion
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10/4/2011 4 Atrial Fibrillation… ??? ? Regulation of Stroke Volume Frank Starling mechanism = increased preload increased contraction Greater filling of the heart (known as an increase in venous return) results in a greater stroke volume in the next beat More blood in the ventricle causes the ventricle to stretch more and contract with more force and thus SV. Factors Affecting Preload Venous return Blood volume Muscle Pump Abdominal/Thoracic pump Venous tone Posture
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10/4/2011 5 Posture? Blood Pressure Blood pressure represents the force exerted by blood against the arterial walls during a cardiac cycle Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP): Provides an estimate of the work of the heart and force that blood exerts against the arterial walls during ventricular systole Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP): The relaxation phase of the
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2011 for the course EXERCISE S PPE 295 taught by Professor Keithderuisseau during the Fall '11 term at Syracuse.

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CV response to exercise PPE - 10/4/2011 Cardiovascular...

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